TESTIMONIALS

 

 

 

My Ironman journey started in 2010, when I just happened to be in Taupo for Ironman weekend. I watched the race through to midnight and was inspired by those finishing in the last few hours. "I'm going to do that" I though. Fast forward to May 2017 and my sons reminded me that I had committed to doing an Ironman before I turned 50. My 50th is in December 2018.

I have run a few marathons, dabbled with ocean swims and barely cycled, although I did have a road bike I bought in 2008. I figured that if I was going to tackle Ironman I couldn't do it alone and sought out a coach.  I reached out to a few friends and eventually got in touch with Sue. 

Sue instantly got that if I was to do this as a first timer, I was going to have to balance training along with work and family commitments. So, I signed up with her CTC squad. It was a little intimidating to turn up to the first winter brick session. There were a whole bunch of Ironman veterans and me who could swim a little and had not really spent very much time on a bike. The reality was that the group were very welcoming and laid back, so my trepidation quickly eased. 

Sue put together my programme in Training Peaks and I followed it through the winter. Other than getting sick or the occasional work overload I managed to complete nearly every session that she scheduled for me. I had friends and colleagues ask me where I found the time to do the 8-10-12 hours of training scheduled and the answer was pretty easy: "get up an hour and half earlier every morning and there it is". That did mean that I was going to bed earlier than my kids most evenings though!

The programme changing to sea swims for Saturday brick and week afternoons gave my swimming a lot of confidence and built team camaraderie. 

The half Ironman camp at Queens Birthday gave a first look at the Taupo cycling course. The lake was too cold to swim in though! This was a great build up for Suffer in Rotrua in December.

The programme stepped up a few notches over January and February with many more hours on the bike, sea and road. To be honest, i had a couple of '#$%& this" training sessions, but Sue encouraged me to put those behind me and move on - that's the power of having a coach.

By the time I headed down to Taupo on Wednesday of race week I was mentally and physically ready to go. I woke up in the middle of the night on the Friday before race morning and felt really calm and looked forward to getting in the water.

I set myself two and a bit goals for race day: Finish it. Enjoy it. I also had a time in mind but not as a fixed goal.

Race day brought clear skies, calm air and flat water. My swim went really well and I got into the thick of it drafting off other simmers where I could or swimming reasonably strongly by myself. Transition to bike was smooth and I set off at a comfortable pace. Having cycled the course once at half Ironman camp and twice at the full camp meant I didn't have any surprises on the course. The first lap was settling down with me passing some and being passed by others. On the second lap, I was passed by very few and found myself regularly passing riders ahead of me - it was very satisfying to cruise past a flash rocket-ship bike on my ten year old roadie! Transition to run went smoothly and I ran by heart rate, keeping it in the aerobic zone. The hours and hours of training paid off now as I felt comfortable with my pace and managed to run the full marathon course.For the whole race I focused on what was immediately ahead of me (thanks for the advice Sue!) and didn't look at my overall time at all - I didn't want to pressure myself to hit some artificial constraint.

On Saturday evening Mike Reilly called "Ed Overy, you are an Ironman!" and I achieved the finish and enjoy (it's not 'fun' but you can enjoy the experience) goals. I also beat the time I had in mind by a full hour.

So I've done the Ironman, now all I have to do in 2018 is turn 50

Ed Overy 2018

 

"Sue is the only coach I've come across that truly listened to my goals and what I wanted to achieve with triathlon. Other coaches I approached seemed to use the same training program template and force them into group training sessions that they gave all their athletes which were not suited to the individual. With Sue's personalised training plans over the past year and endless support each week, it has transformed my success and enjoyment with the sport. I look forward to working with Sue for many years to come to achieve even more ambitious goals."

Elliot Power
25-29 AG

 

"Sue is not just a coach, she is a caring, supportive and inspiring person, if it hadn’t been for her I would have long ago thrown in the towel. No matter what ability you are, Sue will always be encouraging and supportive of what goal you are aiming for." 

"This time last year if you had told me that come 1st March 2014 I will be competing in my first Ironman event I would have told you where to go!

Ironman has been on my ‘list of things to do’ but to be honest I didn’t know if I would ever do one, I didn’t think I had it in me or the time to train, however after supporting a good friend at last year’s event and then hearing she was signing up again for 2014 I thought this was as good as time as ever to bite the bullet and sign up.

The next step was checking with Sue to see if she would be my coach and lucky for me she agreed.

If anyone out there is thinking of doing an ironman but don’t think they have the time to train then sorry but that is no excuse, yes there are some early morning wake ups and some after work discipline with training, it does require some good juggling of work commitments, one thing you might have to sacrifice is some of your socialising especially in the last 3 months when the rides and runs get longer.  What you need is a good coach, good programme and good training buddies who encourage you to get out and they make the training so much more fun.  I had heard many people say it’s all about the journey getting to IM rather than the day, the day is just about enjoying the moment and eating heaps – now I know what they mean and even though there have been times in this journey where I wanted to pull the stop cord and get off- I wouldn’t change anything – the tears, the pain, the melt downs, the sore muscles, the lack of sleep are all part of it, just as much as the friends, support, encouragement, pat on the backs, smiles and accomplishment are.

I can’t recommend highly enough to do the Ironman training camp. For the past few years I had read about these camps and was in admiration for those who went on them, as they always looked worse than the actual IM! But a few weeks ago I headed down to Taupo to do my first and loved it, most of us were first timers but there were a couple that had done IM before so it was great to quiz them on what to expect etc.  I learnt so much from Sue and Brendan and reassured myself I was on track, what you take away from these camps is priceless and they are for everyone no matter what your ability is.

My journey is almost completed, come 1st March I hope to be an ironman, a big thank you to everyone who has helped me get this far.

And for those of you who are thinking about signing up for next year- ‘Just do it’ and enjoy the journey."

 

Christine Augusto
50-55AG

Chris Cox Test.png

Jenny Morgan Test.jpg

"I have been very lucky to have had Sue as a coach for the last few years.  She helped me conquer my fear of open sea swimming and helped me post some personal best times – this included knocking 25 minutes off my Olympic distance triathlon time. What I love most about Sue is her flexible approach – she realises that often work or family situations take precedence over training and adapts a training programme accordingly.  Sue is often one of the biggest supporters during an event which shows her total dedication to her athletes. I am currently working / living and training in Singapore and Sue developed a training programme for me taking into account the very hot and humid conditions experienced here and also did some research on some training tools that would assist the body with cooling – so I believe Sue goes above and beyond. I would highly recommend Sue as a Coach to anyone at whatever level they may currently be at whether it be beginner or advanced level."

Caryn Dawson
50-55 AG

 

  September 5th 2014       Eight of the CTC athletes headed to Taupo to run the Kinlock Half and 10k run on Saturday and then road the Ironman Bike course on Sunday.  A great weekend had by all below is Bern's report   Mention the word 'Taupo' to our tri-buddies and the conversation goes quiet... real quiet. So to get us out of our rut, Coach decided the Kinloch half marathon was the ideal way to break the ice.  So last weekend Sue, Bessie and G-man led Anton, Jen, Shan, Gussy, Liza, Chris and Rachel and a couple of others down to the great lake with a view to build our confidence and give us a bit of a change up in our training. Sue also managed to add in a recovery swim and a blat down the Ironman bike course to fill the weekend!  So road trip   on Friday  , which isn't complete without a stop for pies along the way, as well as the obligatory 20+ toilet stops. We arrived in Acacia Bay in plenty of time, settled in and went into town to grab supplies and seek a remedy to Anton's bike which had more defects than a Russian nuclear reactor! As we turned onto the main road and crossed the bridge into Taupo itself, the ute went deathly silent... as we all knew that in 6 months and 1 day, we would be lining up for the biggest sporting challenge of our lives. We laughed at the prospect, and carried on, picked up our rego packs and headed back for tea and an early night.    Saturday   dawned fine but chilly.  We arrived as per instructions from Sue in nervous anticipation of the day ahead. The half marathon-ers were first off. A jovial bunch who quietened down once the race started due to the 6 odd k's of climbing at the start. The 10k-ers started with earnest, me amongst them. The first part of the course was uphill, which immediately spread the field out. I settled into my pace, and concentrated on what Sue had said as I nervously approached the start area, 'just focus on what you can achieve and don't panic'. The track flattened out and then went downhill and I was still running, so my confidence was high.  I got thru the first 30 minutes of the run and knew that barring a 6k uphill finish I would be ok. So I decided to not rest on my laurels and picked up pace, going from snail to salamander pace. Unfortunately,  the people around me decided to do the same as me, so I lost a few places but kept my pace up. With three k's to go, an uphill dogleg gave us a surprise. The good old hill repeats training kicked in and while others walked the hill, I was able to keep the run on, and actually lift it!  I headed to the finish line pretty happy with my finishing run, and clocked a slow but satisfying 77 minutes.  I then had the new experience of waiting for everyone else to come in to the finish line. To see the exhaustion, acomplishment and determination on peoples faces must make being a coach rewarding, but for our coach she was putting herself out there and completed the half marathon as well... leadership by example.  We all headed to our respective homes for some food and to get ready for a recovery swim. It was chilly outside, which made the warm pool inviting. We swam for a little while, then soaked tired legs in the hot pools, which helped a little.    Sunday   dawned fine and chilly again, bugger not bad enough to pull the pin! We quickly ate and left the house in earnest to ride the bike course as far as we could get in three hours. Legs were still sore and tired, so we were all popped whatever energy giving food we had. Going out with G-man gave us the chance to check the intel on the course. We came away with a better sense of the challenges in front of us in doing a 180km cycle and surviving well enough to follow that up with a 42km run. His advice is experienced based, he knew the qualities of a good ride and bad one, cheers G!  We caught up with Gussy, Chris and Liza out on the course, which allowed us the opportunity to discuss the different aspects of the course, including cycle uniform colours, how to draft on milk tankers and how we have managed to drag our partners into the sport! We also discovered that Heartbreak hill is an apt description for the innoculous climb near the end of each lap. All of us were hurting in our own different ways as we made our way up the climb, which gave us the reality check we needed to ensure we don't blow out early.  We journeyed back to our respective houses, cleaned up, and apart from my unsuccessful attempt to front flip my bike over a roundabout, had a quiet trip back.  Thanks to Sue, G-man and Bessie for giving us a roof over our head while in Taupo, to Chris, Liza, Gussy and Rach for the great company and Anton, Jen and Shan for the pie-pumping road trip and for putting up with my boisterous nocturnal sleeping habits.  As a good mate used to say, its all about the journey.  Bernard

September 5th 2014

 

Eight of the CTC athletes headed to Taupo to run the Kinlock Half and 10k run on Saturday and then road the Ironman Bike course on Sunday.  A great weekend had by all below is Bern's report

Mention the word 'Taupo' to our tri-buddies and the conversation goes quiet... real quiet. So to get us out of our rut, Coach decided the Kinloch half marathon was the ideal way to break the ice.

So last weekend Sue, Bessie and G-man led Anton, Jen, Shan, Gussy, Liza, Chris and Rachel and a couple of others down to the great lake with a view to build our confidence and give us a bit of a change up in our training. Sue also managed to add in a recovery swim and a blat down the Ironman bike course to fill the weekend!

So road trip on Friday, which isn't complete without a stop for pies along the way, as well as the obligatory 20+ toilet stops. We arrived in Acacia Bay in plenty of time, settled in and went into town to grab supplies and seek a remedy to Anton's bike which had more defects than a Russian nuclear reactor! As we turned onto the main road and crossed the bridge into Taupo itself, the ute went deathly silent... as we all knew that in 6 months and 1 day, we would be lining up for the biggest sporting challenge of our lives. We laughed at the prospect, and carried on, picked up our rego packs and headed back for tea and an early night.

Saturday dawned fine but chilly.  We arrived as per instructions from Sue in nervous anticipation of the day ahead. The half marathon-ers were first off. A jovial bunch who quietened down once the race started due to the 6 odd k's of climbing at the start. The 10k-ers started with earnest, me amongst them. The first part of the course was uphill, which immediately spread the field out. I settled into my pace, and concentrated on what Sue had said as I nervously approached the start area, 'just focus on what you can achieve and don't panic'. The track flattened out and then went downhill and I was still running, so my confidence was high.

I got thru the first 30 minutes of the run and knew that barring a 6k uphill finish I would be ok. So I decided to not rest on my laurels and picked up pace, going from snail to salamander pace. Unfortunately,  the people around me decided to do the same as me, so I lost a few places but kept my pace up. With three k's to go, an uphill dogleg gave us a surprise. The good old hill repeats training kicked in and while others walked the hill, I was able to keep the run on, and actually lift it!

I headed to the finish line pretty happy with my finishing run, and clocked a slow but satisfying 77 minutes.

I then had the new experience of waiting for everyone else to come in to the finish line. To see the exhaustion, acomplishment and determination on peoples faces must make being a coach rewarding, but for our coach she was putting herself out there and completed the half marathon as well... leadership by example.

We all headed to our respective homes for some food and to get ready for a recovery swim. It was chilly outside, which made the warm pool inviting. We swam for a little while, then soaked tired legs in the hot pools, which helped a little.

Sunday dawned fine and chilly again, bugger not bad enough to pull the pin! We quickly ate and left the house in earnest to ride the bike course as far as we could get in three hours. Legs were still sore and tired, so we were all popped whatever energy giving food we had. Going out with G-man gave us the chance to check the intel on the course. We came away with a better sense of the challenges in front of us in doing a 180km cycle and surviving well enough to follow that up with a 42km run. His advice is experienced based, he knew the qualities of a good ride and bad one, cheers G!

We caught up with Gussy, Chris and Liza out on the course, which allowed us the opportunity to discuss the different aspects of the course, including cycle uniform colours, how to draft on milk tankers and how we have managed to drag our partners into the sport! We also discovered that Heartbreak hill is an apt description for the innoculous climb near the end of each lap. All of us were hurting in our own different ways as we made our way up the climb, which gave us the reality check we needed to ensure we don't blow out early.

We journeyed back to our respective houses, cleaned up, and apart from my unsuccessful attempt to front flip my bike over a roundabout, had a quiet trip back.

Thanks to Sue, G-man and Bessie for giving us a roof over our head while in Taupo, to Chris, Liza, Gussy and Rach for the great company and Anton, Jen and Shan for the pie-pumping road trip and for putting up with my boisterous nocturnal sleeping habits.

As a good mate used to say, its all about the journey.

Bernard

 

Rachel Larner

Rachel is a world class road cyclist and experienced Personal Trainer. She has spent many years competing in both Road Cycling and Time Trialling with her highest achievement being a silver and bronze medal at The Masters World Championships in Belgium in 2011.

Rachel is sought after by both the professional & amateur endurance athletes for her skills and knowledge to assist them through their training regimes. Her observations, assessments and clinical applications ensure every client gets an individualised treatment plan according to their needs, goals, injuries and/or sport. 

For the desk worker, students, youth athletes and elderly similar and appropriate treatment plans are administered according to their ailments. She is very popular for her easy going nature and is in high demand.

Rachel currently continues to massage the Junior NZ Track Team and has experience with Sports Team Massage with North Harbour Rugby and Northern Mystics Netball. 
Her understanding and outstanding work with sports teams is what sets her apart and why she is in demand now here at the club with our elite athletes. 

Treatments may consist of a variety of the following:

  • Deep Tissue / Compressions
  • Muscle Energy Techniques
  • Mobility & Traction of Joints
  • Neuromuscular Therapy
  • Dry Needling
  • Cupping
  • Thai Foot Massage
  • Trigger Point Therapy
  • Myofascial Release

Rachel can be contacted for more info on: 027 558 5207  or  rachellarner100@gmail.com

 

Sandy Le Couteur

Body In Balance

50 Whakaipo Avenue
3330 Taupo Town District, New Zealand

Taupo

0272747476

 

 

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